Aeromonas jandaei and Aeromonas veronii caused disease and mortality in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (L.)

Dong et al. 2017 – Journal of Fish Diseases. doi:10.1111/jfd.12617

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jfd.12617/full

Abstract

Diseases caused by motile aeromonads in freshwater fish have been generally assumed to be linked with mainly Aeromonas hydrophila while other species were probably overlooked. Here, we identified two isolates of non-A. hydrophila recovered from Nile tilapia exhibiting disease and mortality after exposed to transport-induced stress and subsequently confirmed their virulence in artificial infection. The bacterial isolates were identified as Aeromonas jandaei and Aeromonas veronii based on phenotypic features and homology of 16S rDNA. Experimental infection revealed that the high dose of A. jandaei (3.7 × 106 CFU fish−1) and A. veronii (8.9 × 106 CFU fish−1) killed 100% of experimental fish within 24 h, while a 10-fold reduction dose killed 70% and 50% of fish, respectively. When the challenge dose was reduced 100-fold, mortality of the fish exposed to A. jandaei and A. veronii decreased to 20% and 10%, respectively. The survivors from the latter dose administration were rechallenged with respective bacterial species. Lower mortality of rechallenged fish (0%–12.5%) compared to the control groups receiving a primary infection (37.5%) suggested that the survivors after primary infection were able to resist secondary infection. Fish exposed to either A. jandaei or A. veronii exhibited similar clinical signs and histological manifestation.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Fish Diseases, Other aquatic animals and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s